Group Protests Sale Of Sexplicit Sweets

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Group Protests Sale Of Sexplicit Sweets

By ANTHONY DELLAFLORA
Journal Staff Writer .

Friday, January 22,1982
With several people, mostly from the media, looking oon, some 50 members of the North Valley Gospel church marched for 30 minutes in front of the Candy Lady, a store in Old Town which sells anatomically explicit candy. They stridently voiced their opposition to the business.
As the pickets walked the side walks in front of the store and across the street, high winds howled down narrow San Felipe Street, raising swirls of dust and blowing debris in all directions.
“Hell is Hot,” and “Pornography is Sin,” chanted the marchers above the fury of the winds. Police gathered in knots, waiting to see whether their superiors would ask them to arrest marchers for blocking passage to some of the businesses along the street.
Inside the store, business went on as usual. But store owner Debbie Dorbandt stepped out occasionally to survey the scene.
“I think they’re crazy,” said Mrs. Dorbandt, of the protesters. “They have done nothing but increase my business by 100 percent. It probably would have all died out, but they’re keeping it going.”

Impromptu negotiating between police and protesters, and store owner and landlord kept the level of excitement high, often overshadowing the protesters themselves.
Just minutes after police talked with the Rev. Louis Zaccone of the North Valley Gospel church, urging him to move his flock to the other side of the street, Mrs. Dorbandt’s landlord, Don Turrietta, came into the store and threatened to close the shop.
Mrs. Dorbandt said she would fight back if evicted. If she lost, she would just open another store. Turrietta refused comment.
The pickets continued their protest, apparently unaware that they may have succeeded in their mission of closing down the store. The North Valley Gospel group has also picketed at the 66 Drive-In Theatre on West Central.

article-Group-ProtestjpgInside the store, employees showed off the refrigerator filled with the graphic goodies to the curious, describing them in matter-of-fact tones, while Rev. Zaccone continued heated discussions outside with police, trying to avoid getting his people arrested, but asserting their right to protest at the same time.
Almost as suddenly as it started, Zaccone cut action. The marchers stopped chanting, the wind quieted’ the dust stopped swirling.
However, it would not be the last the Candy Lady would hear from them said Rev. Zoccone. “We’ll be back.”

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